Loading…
COPLAC SEURSCA 19 has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

HSB 207: Oral presentations [clear filter]
Saturday, April 27
 

9:00am EDT

1. His Kind: A Study of Male Sexual Being and Homosociality
His Kind: A Study of Male Sexual Being and Homosociality
Donovan Cleckley
Faculty mentor: Deborah Lowry
University of Montevallo

“To imagine a sexual act that doesn't conform to law or nature is not what disturbs people,” Michel Foucault once said. “But that individuals are beginning to love one another—there's the problem.” Friendship and love, then, allow for the re-vision of human relations between men and between women. But, the imperatives of gender and (hetero)sexuality complicate the ideal communion among humans in society. The project then addresses the development of male homosocial relationships, whether they be gaily straight or queerly fraught with panic and peril. It considers the peculiar social and cultural construction of male sexuality, which has been subject to changes rooted in sexual and economic causes. Works used in this analysis include, among others, Phyllis Chesler’s About Men, bell hooks’ The Will to Change, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s Between Men.

Donovan Cleckley is a senior double major in English and Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of Montevallo. He grew up in Clanton, Alabama and intends to pursue graduate studies in literary and social studies.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
HSB 207

9:00am EDT

2. The Construction of Perceived Authenticity in Ethnic Tourism
The Construction of Perceived Authenticity in Ethnic Tourism
Olivia Lowrey
Faculty mentor: Catherine Cottrell
New College of Florida

Ethnic tourism instigates a reflexive relationship between tourists and host groups which blurs the lines between hospitality and economic exchange. Perceived authenticity, satisfaction, and amount paid for an experience positively correlate, contributing to host groups advertising images which cater to touristic perceptions of authenticity. This study expands understanding of consumer decision making by exploring the cognitive underpinnings of perceived authenticity in ethnic tourism using representativeness heuristics and prototype theory. 271 respondents from Amazon Mechanical Turk completed both a survey containing a description of an ethnic tourism experience which varied across four levels of prototypicality, and measures of perceived authenticity, satisfaction, and price. Analysis indicated that as hosts are presented closer to a cognitive prototype of an ethnic group, perceived authenticity increased. These results indicate that specific characteristics of host group representation influence tourist perceptions in ways that could have implications for host group autonomy over group image.

Olivia Lowrey is an economics and psychology student in her last semester at New College of Florida. Her research interests include behavioral economics and decision making from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
HSB 207

9:00am EDT

3. The Limits of Knowledge: Responses to Darwinism among German Scientists
The Limits of Knowledge: Responses to Darwinism among German Scientists
Robert Powers
Faculty mentor: Mark Clark
University of Virginia’s College at Wise

This presentation focuses on responses to Darwinism among German scientists and religious thinkers. The scientists foregrounded in this study are the Jesuit entomologist Erich Wasmann and the botanists Johannes Reinke and Eberhard Dennert, who critically examined Darwin's theory of natural selection. In doing so, they did not resort to what we would now label “fundamentalist tropes.” Rather, they were willing to accept empirical evidence and thought in broad religious and philosophical terms about evolution’s mechanisms and the associated implications. This research also represents an attempt to contextualize Darwinism. In Germany, his ideas were quickly appropriated by materialists and largely popularized by the monist Ernst Haeckel, who put his own philosophical “spin” on Darwin’s conclusions. German scientists’ arguments against materialists’ employment of Darwin’s ideas fit with other comments on the limits of knowledge, so I attempt to situate them within the broader intellectual history of the nineteenth century.

Robert Powers is a history and German major from Dungannon, Virginia. He plans to pursue graduate study in history this coming fall. 

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
HSB 207

10:15am EDT

1. Altering Femininity through Analysis of Female Stereotypes and Aristotle's Four Levels of Characterization
Altering Femininity through Analysis of Female Stereotypes and Aristotle's Four Levels of Characterization
Bailee Adams
Faculty mentor: Amy Pinney
Georgia College & State University

An actor’s ability to transform into a character is a crucial element of theatrical magic. To do so, an actor must rely on clues left by the playwright. When taking on the role of Jeanine in the play The Marriage Counselor, I sought to evaluate the most effective way to portray this character. To do so, I evaluated Jeanine’s and my female stereotype based on the work of the Guerrilla Girls (2003). The character of Jeanine was then created through analysis of her four levels of characterization based on Aristotle’s Poetics (335 B.C.). The evaluation of the levels of characterization were ultimately presented as imperative to the research process, as it informed Jeanine’s physicality, speech inflection, and interaction with other characters. The results indicated the most effective way to portray a female character is to assess the dialogue, evaluate her stereotype, and use that to drive the analysis of Aristotle’s four levels of characterization.

Bailee Adams is from Greensboro, Georgia and is a Theatre major. She plans to pursue an MFA in Acting after graduating from Georgia College & State University. 

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am EDT
HSB 207

10:15am EDT

2. The Great Moon Hoax of 1835: How Scientific Prints Prompted Social Criticism in the Romantic Era
The Great Moon Hoax of 1835: How Scientific Prints Prompted Social Criticism in the Romantic Era
Tia N. Kuhns
Faculty mentor: Leisa Rundquist
University of North Carolina at Asheville

The lithographs that accompanied the Great Astronomical Discoveries Lately Made By Sir John Herschel, L.L.D, F.R.S, &c. At The Cape of Good Hope, which appeared via The New York Sun newspaper between August 26th and 31st of 1835, captivated public attention, resulting in a mass journalistic sensation. The intentional artistic style, densely layered composition, and inclusion of tropical vegetation in the illustrations added to the prestige and believability of the depicted hoax. Further, the prints serve as an allegory for social and political issues of the time, such as the movement to abolish slavery in the United States, and the relationships between European colonial powers and indigenous peoples. Through comparison of The Sun’s original lithographs with past landscapes, like the satirical garden paintings of Watteau, and contemporary scientific exploration imagery of Latin America, the paper establishes the role of these images as a social lens.

Tia Kuhns was born in Burlington, North Carolina. She is currently a candidate for a BFA in printmaking at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, with plans to pursue an MFA after graduating in Fall of 2019.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am EDT
HSB 207

10:15am EDT

3. Projection as Cultivation: An Ecogothic Examination of Romance of the Forest
Projection as Cultivation: An Ecogothic Examination of Romance of the Forest
Conrad Schaffer Vignati
Faculty mentor: Miriam Wallace
New College of Florida

Gothic literature often uses spaces as abstractions, a projected “psychic landscape” in which the intentions of the characters resonate with a setting that responds to their intimate desires and fears. In doing so, the Gothic created cultural touchstones that are still effective today. One such sign is the forest, a space included in a narrative to serve the needed function. This paper examines how Ann Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest frames that titular nonhuman realm, and how it relates to gendered perceptions of power. Her forest shifts between an anthropomorphized entity and a static space — it is both an artistic representation of nature that elevates the characters into sublime terror, or a game park, something to be cultivated through human control. In either case, Radcliffe identifies the dangers of the forest as an extension of male failure, and strains to locate a reconciliation of nature through property lines.

Conrad Schaffer Vignati is an English major at New College of Florida, currently working on his undergraduate thesis, an ecocritical examination of Gothic forests. His research interests include 18th and 19th century British literature and culture, environmental and ecological theory, storytelling, and intersectional approaches in critical theory.


Saturday April 27, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am EDT
HSB 207