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HSB 202: Oral presentations [clear filter]
Saturday, April 27
 

9:00am EDT

1. Selves-As-Citizens: Redressing the Private-Public Distinction
Selves-As-Citizens: Redressing the Private-Public Distinction
Hannah Sine
Faculty mentor: Aron Edidin
New College of Florida

Utilizing Hegelian thought and dialectic methods, I consider the implications of compartmentalizing public and private life in our notions of the citizen. Inspired by relational concepts of personhood in feminist philosophy, I reconstruct Hegel's understanding of personhood as presented in the Elements of the Philosophy of Right. This view of personhood is used in the syllogism of the Ethical Life, thereby influencing the subsequent development of his concept of the citizen. I make use of Hegel's framework to call attention to the arbitrary division between citizenship and personhood, demonstrating the shortcomings of this modularized notion of persons; notably, in its failure to maintain a continuous conception of the self. Through further implementation of his syllogistic structure, I argue that the self and citizen are similar structures which can be successfully integrated into a coherent concept of self, thereby developing a contemporary, relational view of selves-as-citizens.

Hannah Sine is a philosophy student at New College of Florida, not far away from her hometown of Naples, Florida. After graduation she plans to pursue a doctoral program in Philosophy and eventually become a professor.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
HSB 202

9:00am EDT

2. Persuading a Temple: The Rhetoric of Jim Jones
Persuading a Temple: The Rhetoric of Jim Jones
Katherine Dotten
Faculty mentor: Amy Clark
University of Virginia’s College at Wise

This research project examines classical rhetorical strategies of logos, ethos, and pathos within the spoken rhetoric of Jim Jones in the formation of People’s Temple in the 1950s to late 1970s. Additionally, the research includes the contextual factors that influenced Jones’ efficiency as a persuasive speaker. A rhetorical analysis of People’s Temple footage and survivor testimony gathered by PBS, along with a database on Jonestown, reveals rhetorical patterns that Jones used to gain, maintain, and manipulate a following of hundreds of people. Understanding the ways in which cult leaders like Jones use rhetoric to persuade followers can contribute to similar studies and an ongoing discussion about ethics and influence.

Katherine Dotten is a Wise, Virginia native attending University of Virginia's College at Wise to obtain a degree in Communication Studies. After graduating in spring of 2020, she will be attending East Tennessee State University to obtain a master’s degree in Speech Pathology.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
HSB 202

9:00am EDT

3. Perceptions of Student Service Participation in a Liberal Arts Education
Perceptions of Student Service Participation in a Liberal Arts Education
Lily Johnson
Faculty mentor: Amanda Reinke
Georgia College & State University

Community service is consistently listed as a cornerstone of liberal arts. Most research on service participation in college gathered quantitative data to analyze volunteering motivations at universities with a service-learning component. Georgia College claims community service is an integral part of their mission that helps students become engaged citizens. This is reflected by the large proportion of GC students who volunteer. There is little data examining student perceptions of service as part of their GC experience. This research project addresses gaps using two methods: participant observation and semi-structured interviewing with students and employees. Preliminary findings display a wide array of motivations for student service participation relating to both intrinsic and extrinsic motives. Interview data relates service to the liberal arts mission as a method of expanding perspectives of students through participation service. These results appear to support current literature on this topic and explore deep-seated motivators for voluntary service participation.

Lily Johnson is a junior Psychology major and Anthropology minor and will graduate as a Certified Nonprofit Professional. She intends to pursue a career in the nonprofit field, and is from Dalton, Georgia.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
HSB 202

10:15am EDT

1. The Power Suit: A Rhetorical Examination of Gendered Professional Attire
The Power Suit: A Rhetorical Examination of Gendered Professional Attire
Erica Lewis
Faculty mentor: Cynthia Mwenja
University of Montevallo

Textual Google inquiries can result in images and in longer textual resources, presenting a means of analyzing a population's collective ideas about certain images and the ideas that they are associated with. Upon searching various arrangements of words and synonyms, professional clothing images presented a plethora of gender rules for how to "look professional." From clothing color and cuts to the diction used to describe them, these Google images reflect what a majority of our society and the media that informs it agrees to be professional based on gender stereotypes.

Graduating in May 2019, Erica Lewis is pursuing her BFA in Studio Arts and her BA in English. Officially concentrating in printmaking and in drawing, Lewis is primarily focused on composition and rhetoric within her language studies and wishes to further her research into visual and textual rhetoric after graduation, possibly in an MFA Studio or PhD-track English program.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am EDT
HSB 202

10:15am EDT

2. Living to Survive: Causes of and Solutions to Poverty among Single Mothers
Living to Survive: Causes of and Solutions to Poverty among Single Mothers
Sabrina Mikes
Faculty mentor: Sarah Hernandez
New College of Florida

This purpose of this research was to explore the causes of and potential solutions to poverty among low-income, white, single mothers in Sarasota, Florida. In order to complete this, I conducted in-depth interviews with 5 mothers. I found that bad partners and divorce, the role of single motherhood, low quality work, and inaccessible resources were all major contributors to poverty among the women. Solutions ranged from individual development to community support and structural change. I ultimately argue that ideological and economic transformation are necessary for alleviation of poverty among these women which can shed light onto solutions for the larger population.
 
Sabrina Mikes is a 4th year thesis student at New College of Florida. She studies Sociology and takes special interest in the intersections of class, race, and gender as well as the potential solutions to these inequalities.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am EDT
HSB 202

10:15am EDT

3. Welcome to Gendered Dada
Welcome to Gendered Dada
Morgan Drawdy
Faculty mentor: Katherine Anania
Georgia College & State University

This paper explores the works of art throughout the Dada art period from three specific artists: Marcel Duchamp, Francis Picabia, and Baroness Else Von Freytag-Loringhoven. It delves deep into the making of the pieces and the influences behind them. The pieces are analyzed through the lens of gender and gender bias that is caused by the changing of societal roles during World War One, touching on topics such as women entering the work force and the evolution and devolution of the typical masculine role throughout history. The paper is brought together to explore how these societal changes influenced works of art through this specific artistic period.

Morgan Drawdy is from Cumming, Georgia and is a Fine Arts Major with minors in Mathematics and Business Administration. Drawdy’s post-graduation plans are to attend graduate school for an aspect of industrial design.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 10:15am - 11:15am EDT
HSB 202

11:30am EDT

1. Divine Artistry: The Power of Materiality and Craft in Statuette and Arm Reliquaries of the Holy Roman Empire
Divine Artistry: The Power of Materiality and Craft in Statuette and Arm Reliquaries of the Holy Roman Empire
Jake L. Swartz
Faculty mentors: Leisa Rundquist, Laurel Taylor, and Rodger Payne
University of North Carolina at Asheville

Statuette and arm reliquaries held unique significance within the Holy Roman Empire. Reliquaries existed as symbols of economic, religious, and political power. Containing the remains of saints, these ornate boxes were beautifully decorated to reflect the power of their associated saint. Often these decorations required complex expensive materials and techniques to create potent images that portrayed biblical figures or events. These gilded feretories sat atop altars in palaces and cathedrals as they were often used in pilgrimage and other devotional practices, along with being traded and collected by elites. In many cases leaders often kept reliquaries close at hand as power from reliquaries came from their proximity. Building upon existing research, this paper seeks to address an unrecognized power in reliquaries that focuses on the political and cosmological resonance in the elaborately adorned container rather than the relic inside.

Jake Swartz is a dual major of art history and anthropology from Cary, North Carolina. He hopes to work in an art museum for a year before moving onto graduate school to earn master’s and doctoral degrees in archaeology. 

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm EDT
HSB 202

11:30am EDT

2. Bad Faith and The Big Lebowski
Bad Faith and The Big Lebowski
Leah Bender
Faculty mentor: Aron Edidin
New College of Florida

Here I explore Sartre's concepts of freedom and responsibility (from his 1943 book Being and Nothingness) as they are evident in the Coen brother’s 1998 classic film The Big Lebowski. I examine the actions and interactions of the two Lebowskis (the 'big' Lebowski and The Dude) in order to demonstrate that--although they share the same surname--the two men approach freedom and responsibility in markedly different ways. Despite their apparent differences (viz., that the Dude prefers to ‘abide’ by life’s misfortunes while the big Lebowski considers himself a self-made man), I also explain the ways in which both of the Lebowskis--along with many of the other characters encountered in the film--ultimately find themselves in what Sartre calls 'bad faith'; i.e., the state of individuals who deny the reality of being essentially free, and, consequently, deny any of the responsibility that this entails.

Leah Bender is a 3rd year philosophy student at New College of Florida, originally hailing from Washington DC. She is particularly interested in philosophy of mind and intends to write her senior thesis on consciousness and artificial intelligence. 

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm EDT
HSB 202

11:30am EDT

3. Through the Veil of Christianity: the (Almost) Evangelization of the Nahuas in Colonial Mexico
Through the Veil of Christianity: the (Almost) Evangelization of the Nahuas in Colonial Mexico
Sarah Burke
Faculty mentor: Veronica Rodriguez
The University of Virginia's College at Wise

When Spain colonized Mexico, they attempted to convert the native Nahuas to Christianity. The church kept records in which they provide examples of the methods used to teach Christian concepts to the Nahuas. The Spaniards’ limited understanding of the Nahuatl language hybridized the Christian religion and the Nahuatl religion. I will begin with the Spaniards’ failure to translate Christian ideas into the Nahuatl language accurately. They either created a new Nahuatl word, supplied a Spanish word, or reshaped a pre-existing concept in the Nahuatl mentality. I will analyze how the Spaniards failed to accurately and effectively translate the ideas they carried even though they developed a functional system for translating the words themselves. I will discuss how the Spaniards did not establish an orthodox Christianity, but instead created a hybrid that was born from learning Christian concepts through a lens of Nahuatl understanding, thus creating a different religious practice.

Sarah Burke is from Pound, Virginia and will graduate this May with a Bachelor's degree, majoring in French and Spanish, with a minor in German. After graduation she is taking a gap year and then applying to law school.

Speakers

Saturday April 27, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm EDT
HSB 202